Back to Top

Central Statistics Office

Gaeilge

 Skip navigation

Extra information
For more information on this release:
E-mail: nat_acc@cso.ie Mark Manto (+353) 1 498 4204 Patrick Kilduff (+353) 1 498 4390 Paul Morrin (+353) 1 498 4387
For general information on CSO statistics:
information@cso.ie (+353) 21 453 5000 Visit StatCentral.ie, the portal to Ireland's official statistics On-line ISSN 2009-6291
CSO statistical release, 30 November 2016, 11am

Supply and Use Tables for Ireland

2013

Detailed picture of the structure of the Irish economy in 2013

Figure 1 Percentage type of Use table products by NACE, 2013
go to full release

The Supply and Use Tables for 2013 provide a detailed picture of the transactions of goods and services by industries and consumers in the Irish economy in a single year. They highlight the inter-industry flows that lie behind the National Accounts main aggregates such as gross output, operating surplus and external trade movements, etc. These tables also serve as an integrated framework for all production statistics and are used as a statistical tool to compile and reconcile independent estimates of National Accounts aggregates. The Supply and Use framework shows the components of gross value added (GVA) by industry as well as imports, exports and taxes and subsidies on products. The GVA in the Use table measures the contribution to GDP made by each particular industry branch.

Exploratory Supply and Use Tables in previous year prices (PYP) are included in this publication (Table 3 and Table 4 respectively). Supply and Use Tables in PYP allow for the detailed examination of volume changes by sector. Further details on the compilation of these tables are provided below and in the Background Notes section at the foot of this page. Both an explanatory note and a visual overview guide to the tables are provided in links on the right hand side of this page.

Summaries are provided below of the four 2013 tables in this publication. These are Table 1 (Supply Table at basic prices), Table 2 (Use Table at purchasers' prices),  Table 3 (Supply Table at previous year prices) and Table 4 (Use Table at previous year prices).

Table 1 - Supply Table at basic prices

This table provides estimates of the supply of goods and services (products) by domestic industries as well as imports of goods and services. The supply of products is presented in the rows while the columns show the industry branches that produce these goods and services. Each industry is classified according to whichever product accounts for the largest part of its output. Its principal production, shown on the diagonal elements of the Supply table, is therefore larger than its secondary production shown on the off-diagonal elements. A summary of the 2013 Supply table at basic prices is shown below.

Table A Summary of 2013 Supply Table at basic prices €m
 Industries    €m
 Agriculture, forestry & fishingManufacturingConstruction Distribution, transport & communicationBusiness servicesOther servicesTotal DomesticImports c.i.f. (cost, insurance & freight inclusive)MarginsProduct taxes less subsidiesTotal Supply (purchasers' prices)
Products(1-3)(5-39)(41-43)(45-61)(62-82)(84-97)     
Agriculture, forestry & fishing8,5521700008,5691,1991,4697611,313
Manufacturing14107,331030000107,64565,49123,97010,524207,631
Construction24010,59500010,619001,97912,599
Distribution, transport & communication122,073072,4554,439078,98020,252-25,4391,68675,478
Business services04,710705,833132,614488143,71569,97902,304215,998
Other services61062044,13244,2025550-65344,103
Output at basic prices8,608114,13310,66578,651137,05344,620393,729157,476015,917567,122

Table 2 - Use Table at purchasers’ prices

This table shows the use of products by domestic industry and by the final demand sectors (("final demand" comprises consumption by households, government, non-profit organisations serving households (NPISH), gross fixed capital formation (GFCF) and exports)). As in the previous table, industries are shown in the columns and products in the rows. Thus the columns of figures for industries NACE 1 - 97 show the goods and services used by each industry for the purposes of achieving its output. The purchases in these columns relate to intermediate consumption only. The capital purchases are shown separately but a breakdown by industry is not provided. All the purchases of households in their private (non-business) capacity as consumers are included under household consumption with the exception of the purchase of dwellings, which is included with gross fixed capital formation. A summary of the 2013 Use table at purchasers' prices is shown below.

Table B Summary of 2013 Use Table at purchasers' prices €m
 Industries   €m
 Agriculture, forestry & fishingManufacturingConstruction Distribution, transport & communicationBusiness servicesOther servicesTotal inter-industryConsumption and GFCFExports f.o.b. (free on board)Total Uses
Products(1-3)(5-39)(41-43)(45-61)(62-82)(84-97)    
Agriculture, forestry & fishing2,3514,84327591267,3072,2231,78411,313
Manufacturing3,50636,7794,0628,1376,8833,91363,28053,19691,155207,631
Construction674561,0073984063352,6699,930012,599
Distribution, transport & communication2325,3112398,0149,9421,17324,91019,70130,86775,478
Business services26326,30071122,36270,8744,833125,34323,93266,723215,998
Other services27216695471,5413,5275,92837,35981744,103
Total Intermediate consumption6,44573,9056,11639,51889,64713,807229,437146,340191,345567,122
          
Compensation of Employees (COE)69011,0063,19017,17515,03924,54571,646   
Gross Operating Surplus (GOS)3,16128,4091,33121,42431,7796,28992,394   
Taxes less subsidies on production-1,68881228534587-21252   
Gross Value Added (GVA) at basic prices2,16340,2284,54939,13347,40630,813164,293   
Output at basic prices8,608114,13310,66578,651137,05344,620393,729   

Table 3 - Supply Table at previous year prices

and

Table 4 - Use Table at previous year prices

These pair of exploratory tables are derived from the preceding Supply table and Use table valued in current prices. These deflated tables use the double deflation approach, which is the internationally preferred and recommended approach. The concept of value added is defined as output minus intermediate consumption. Consequently value added at previous year prices is best measured by separately deflating the output and the intermediate consumption and deriving the residual. The value added so deflated to previous year prices can be compared with the value added of the previous year in its current prices to determine the “volume” growth. Double deflation takes account of changing levels of intermediate consumption required to produce the output and the relationship of both to value added. The levels of intermediate consumption may change for a variety of reasons. For example improved production methods may be employed. Better fuel efficiency may be achieved. Increased levels of marketing and advertising may be required. Advances in scientific knowledge may allow much improved output, particularly in the high technology sectors, without proportional increases in inputs since the inputs include regular, stable items such as accountancy fees, rent, heat, light, etc. The Supply and Use based estimates take account of both the outputs and the inputs. A summary of the 2013 Supply table at previous year prices and the 2013 Use table at previous year prices are shown below.

Table C Summary of 2013 Supply Table at previous year prices €m
 Industries    €m
 Agriculture, forestry & fishingManufacturingConstruction Distribution, transport & communicationBusiness servicesOther servicesTotal DomesticImports c.i.f. (cost, insurance & freight inclusive)MarginsProduct taxes less subsidiesTotal Supply (purchasers' prices)
Products(1-3)(5-39)(41-43)(45-61)(62-82)(84-97)     
Agriculture, forestry & fishing7,8981600007,9141,1841,4977310,669
Manufacturing14107,603029500107,91265,59824,27510,587208,371
Construction23010,29300010,316001,92312,239
Distribution, transport & communication122,073072,3334,413078,83020,207-25,7721,67774,942
Business services04,646695,757130,739460141,67270,29802,279214,249
Other services61060043,59343,6605170-65043,527
Output at basic prices7,953114,33910,36378,445135,15144,053390,304157,804015,888563,996
Table D Summary of 2013 Use Table at previous year prices €m
 Industries   €m
 Agriculture, forestry & fishingManufacturingConstruction Distribution, transport & communicationBusiness servicesOther servicesTotal inter-industryConsumption and GFCFExports f.o.b. (free on board)Total Uses
Products(1-3)(5-39)(41-43)(45-61)(62-82)(84-97)    
Agriculture, forestry & fishing2,2174,55726561246,8822,1391,64810,669
Manufacturing3,48536,9263,9888,1786,7743,90263,25453,05392,064208,371
Construction654429763863933252,5869,653012,239
Distribution, transport & communication2345,2862408,0589,9851,16224,96519,44930,52874,942
Business services25826,37370522,14270,6474,791124,91622,95766,376214,249
Other services26207695291,5183,4775,82636,92477743,527
Total Intermediate consumption6,28473,7926,00439,34989,31813,681228,428144,175191,393563,996
Gross Value Added (GVA) at PYP1,66840,5474,35839,09645,83330,372161,875
Output at basic prices7,953114,33910,36378,445135,15144,053390,304

Table 1 is the Supply Table at basic prices €m: Supply and Use Tables 2013 Table 1 (XLS 35KB)

Table 2 is the Use Table at purchasers' prices €m: Supply and Use Tables 2013 Table 2 (XLS 75KB)

Table 3 is the Supply Table at previous year prices €m: Supply and Use Tables 2013 Table 3 (XLS 36KB)

Table 4 is the Use Table at previous year prices €m: Supply and Use Tables 2013 Table 4 (XLS 71KB)

Background Notes

1. Background to the Tables

The main aggregates in the current price Supply and Use Tables (value added, final consumption, imports and exports) are consistent with the current price estimates shown in the publication National Income and Expenditure 2015 (NIE15) based on the revised European System of Accounts methodology (ESA 2010). However, the starting point of the tables is the CSO business surveys (e.g. Census of Industrial Production, the Prodcom Inquiry and Annual Services Inquiry). Considerable use is also made of published reports of government departments, semi-state bodies and financial institutions. Producing Supply and Use Tables thus requires the examination of consistency and coherency of data and aggregates from national accounts, external trade statistics, balance of international payments results and data provided by the business surveys.

In general, data on purchases is more difficult to assemble than data on turnover. The manufacturing inputs in this 2013 publication however have been assembled from data gathered by the Census of Industrial Production (CIP) Inputs Survey of 2005 and 2010. This is a five-yearly survey of manufacturing industry which was conducted as an integral part of the 2005 and 2010 CIP. In the case of non-manufacturing industry, estimates were made based on data from the Annual Services Inquiry and on other limited information. A degree of balancing is necessary in the construction of any Supply and Use Tables to fit the national accounts data with data from other surveys. Consequently allowances must be made for a lack of absolute accuracy in the figures in this report. They are overall estimates and not absolute definitive data.

The Supply and Use Tables display details of the economy in terms of 58 industry groups and 58 product groups. The sectoral classification used is the two-digit level of the NACE Rev. 2 referred to as the A64 coding of industry activities. The product classification used is the sixty four product grouping referred to as the P64. The tables are initially constructed using 82 industry and 82 product groups and are then condensed for confidentiality and quality purposes. 

The basis of the methodology used is described in the Eurostat Manual of Supply, Use and Input-Output Tables (see http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat/documents/3859598/5902113/KS-RA-07-013-EN.PDF/b0b3d71e-3930-4442-94be-70b36cea9b39?version=1.0) and in the UN Handbook of Input-Output Table Compilation and Analysis (see http://unstats.un.org/unsd/publication/SeriesF/SeriesF_74E.pdf).

 2. Overview of the Tables

Table 1 - 2013 Supply Table at basic prices (product by industry)

(See above for summary text and table)

This table provides estimates of the supply of goods and services (products) by domestic industries as well as imports of goods and services. The supply of products is presented in the rows while the columns show the industry branches that produce these goods and services. Each industry is classified according to whichever product accounts for the largest part of its output. Its principal production, shown on the diagonal elements of the Supply table, is therefore larger than its secondary production shown on the off-diagonal elements. A summary of the 2013 Supply table is shown above.

Treatment of the motor trade, retail and wholesale

The outputs of the distribution sector are defined in a special way for national accounts purposes and may not be as expected. The motor trade, retail and wholesale activities are regarded as producing a service which is measured as the price at which their products are sold minus the purchase price of these products (which they purchased for direct resale). This is referred to as the gross margin. Thus the retail supermarket is not regarded as providing food or drink nor is the drapery outlet regarded as providing clothes. In the Supply and Use framework, the food and clothes are the products of their respective industries or are imported and retailers are regarded as providing a sales service (see the distribution rows 45 – 47 of the Supply table).

The gross margin is also used to measure the output of distribution activity by firms that are mainly involved in another activity such as manufacturing.

Valuation

The values of the domestically produced products in the Supply table are shown initially at basic prices while they are transformed to purchasers’ prices in the final columns. The basic price is the price receivable by the producer for a unit of a good or service produced, minus any tax payable as a consequence of its production or sale (i.e. taxes on products), plus any subsidy receivable on that unit as a consequence of its production or sale (i.e. subsidies on products). Thus the basic price excludes the well-known product taxes such as VAT, excise duties, import duties etc. In theory, the basic price excludes any transport charges invoiced separately by the producer but includes any transport charges charged on the same invoice. It does not include any trade margin earned by reselling the product by another trader following manufacture or importation. The basic price measures the amount retained by the producer and is therefore the price most relevant for the producer’s decision making.

The purchaser’s price is the price the purchaser actually pays for the product including any taxes less subsidies on the product (but excluding deductible taxes). The conversion from basic prices to purchasers’ prices involves distributing the trade margins of retailers and wholesalers among the products on which they are charged. The mechanism for doing this can be seen in the "trade margins" column of the Supply table. Here the margin in the motor trade and domestic wholesale and retail trades appears as negative values in rows 45 to 47 as these margins are distributed in the same column among the products on which they fall.

Imports in the Supply table are shown by detailed product at c.i.f. (cost, insurance and freight inclusive) prices as in the published merchandise trade statistics. Imports are shown at f.o.b. (free on board) prices in the NIE. Cost, insurance and freight (c.i.f.) requires the seller to arrange for the carriage of goods by sea to a port of destination, and provide the buyer with the documents necessary to obtain the goods from the carrier. Free on board (f.o.b.) on the other hand requires the seller to deliver goods on board a vessel designated by the buyer. The seller fulfils their obligations to deliver when the goods have passed over the ship's rail. The difference between the two valuations is shown as an adjustment in the imports column of the Supply table to move from a c.i.f. to a f.o.b. valuation. The adjusted imports total is consistent with the imports figure from the NIE. Given that the supply of a product must, by necessity, equal total use of a product, a similar adjustment is included for exports on the Use table. As with imports, the adjusted exports total is consistent with the exports figure from the NIE.

Table 2 - 2013 Use Table at purchasers' prices (product by industry)

(See above for summary text and table)

This table shows the use of products by domestic industry and by the final demand sectors (("final demand" comprises consumption by households, government, non-profit organisations serving households (NPISH), capital formation (GFCF) and exports)). As in the previous table, industries are shown in the columns and products in the rows. Thus the columns of figures for industries NACE 1 - 97 show the goods and services used by each industry for the purposes of achieving its output. The purchases in these columns relate to intermediate consumption only. The capital purchases are shown separately but a breakdown by industry is not provided. All the purchases of households in their private (non-business) capacity as consumers are included under household consumption with the exception of the purchase of dwellings, which is included with gross fixed capital formation. The purchases include domestically produced and imported products indistinguishably.

Additional information for each industry is shown at the end of the industry columns, where estimates of the components of the gross value added by each industry are supplied. These are in the form of compensation of employees (COE), non-product (i.e. overhead) taxes (e.g. rates) and non-product subsidies (e.g. employment subsidies), net operating surplus (or profits) and consumption of capital (this term encompasses depreciation and amortisation). The latter two items, when combined, are referred to as gross operating surplus (GOS). The sum of these rows is referred to as the gross value added of the industry and is equal to the output of the industry minus its intermediate consumption costs. A summary of the 2013 Use table at purchasers' prices is shown above.

Valuation

The purchases of the products in the Use table are valued at purchasers’ prices, which have already been explained in the note on the Supply table above. There is no distinction in this table between imported and home produced products. The gross value added of the industries shown in the second last row, being equal to the output of the industries valued at basic prices minus their intermediate consumption at purchasers’ prices is regarded as being valued at basic prices.

Balancing the Supply Table with the Use Table

The total supply of each product in the last column of the Supply table is equal to the total use of the product in the last column of the Use table. Similarly, the total output of each industry in the last row of the Supply table is equal to the sum of the intermediate consumption and value added of that industry, which is the last row of the Use table.

Table 3 - Supply Table at previous year prices

and

Table 4 – Use Table at previous year prices

(See above for summary text and tables)

The above pair of tables extend the series of exploratory Supply and Use Tables (S&UT) in previous year prices (PYP) which were initiated in 2011 and first published in October 2012. The October 2012 publication contained Supply and Use Tables for 2006 and 2007 in PYP. Further tables in the series relating to 2008 and 2009 were published in June 2013. The 2012 PYP tables were published simultaneously with the current price tables in 2015 for the first time. These tables relate to 2013. As for the current price S&UT, PYP Tables are compiled, balanced and deflated for 82 business sectors and published at a more aggregated level of 58 business sectors for confidentiality and reliability purposes.

The double deflation methodology employed in compiling these tables is similar to that described in the October 2012, June 2013 and December 2015 publications. The 2013 S&UT in current prices were deflated by the most appropriate price indices available to obtain the PYP versions of the tables. A summary table of the deflators employed to produce the PYP tables by NACE are provided below in Background Notes Table A along with a list of abbreviations and acronyms.

Supply and Use Tables 2013 Background Notes Table A (PDF 460KB)

One of the benefits of S&UT in previous year prices is that they facilitate the compilation of “real” or volume changes from year to year in the value added generated by detailed business sectors. In order for this to be done accurately it is necessary to have Gross Value Added (GVA) in current prices for the previous year for the detailed business sectors to which the data in PYP relates. It is furthermore necessary that both sets of data are comparable. National accounts data are regularly revised. If one set of data incorporates revisions that equally apply to the other but have not yet been incorporated in them then any comparisons can be affected by the methodological differences in the two sets of data. The National Accounts data published in the annual compendium of tables “National Income and Expenditure” (NIE) do not contain Gross Value Added (GVA) in current prices for 58 business groups against which the data in PYP can be compared to derive volume changes. The most detailed table available relates to 37 business groups and is contained in Table 21 (current prices) and Table 22 (constant prices) of the NIE.  Volume changes derived alternatively by comparing GVA in current prices from the published 2012 S&UT (based on 2012 data in NIE2014) with GVA in PYP from the 2013 S&UT in PYP (based on 2013 data in NIE2015) will also be affected by different data vintages.

Values of the main National Accounts aggregates (e.g. GDP, PCE, Capital Formation, etc.) can be compared in PYP terms with their counterparts in current terms from the NIE publication with which they were aligned when compiling the S&UT tables (NIE 2015 in the case of the 2013 S&UT). These comparisons provide estimates of “volume” changes or real growth over the year in the aggregates concerned. Background Notes Table B below provides these estimates with comparisons against the corresponding growth rates already published in the NIE 2015 publication. These volume changes are not subject to data vintage issues as both the 2012 and 2013 data are taken from NIE2015.

Supply and Use Tables 2013 Background Notes Table B (XLS 12KB)

The Supply and Use Tables in previous year prices above are experimental and will be compiled annually as part of the European Union program of statistics to which member states subscribe.

Balancing of deflated Total Supply and Total Use tables

The tables in this publication are balanced so that total supply equals total use for each NACE group. The degree of “automatic” balancing which was required to remove the residual imbalances remaining at the end was minor as can be seen from Background Notes Table C below. This table displays the level of discrepancy which occurred at 2‐digit NACE Rev. 2 level following the deflation of the 2013 Supply and Use Tables. It can be seen that at the level of all products combined there was extremely close agreement between Supply and Use in PYP. The deflated Supply and Use differed by only 0.04% in 2013. However there were some bigger discrepancies at the 2‐digit NACE Rev. 2 product level although none of these could really be considered exceptional, particularly for an exploratory set of tables. Some of the larger differences between Supply and Use in PYP in 2013 were in NACE 28 ‘Machinery and equipment n.e.c.' (1.2%) and NACE 13-15 ‘Textiles, wearing apparel and leather products’ (1.2%). The full list is shown in the table below.

Supply and Use Tables 2013 Background Notes Table C (XLS 14KB)

3. Consistency with other CSO Publications

Reconciliation with the National Accounts

In these current price tables the final demand aggregates and the components of value added are taken from the national accounts which provide control totals. This concordance is with the 2013 estimates as published in National Income and Expenditure 2015 (NIE15). Background Notes Table D below shows the aggregate figures in the 2013 Supply and Use Tables that agree with figures from NIE15.

Supply and Use Tables 2013 Background Notes Table D (XLS 12KB)

The publication of NIE15 attracted much interest and comment given the significant revisions to a number of the aggregates. These were concentrated in the 2015 data and, to a lesser extent, in the 2014 data. There were little or no implications for the 2013 data with which these current price Supply and Use tables are consistent. Further details on these NIE15 revisions and their impacts on the 2015 figures can be found at the following websites:

http://www.cso.ie/en/media/csoie/newsevents/documents/pr_GDPexplanatorynote.pdf

http://www.cso.ie/en/media/csoie/newsevents/documents/IrelandEconomicGrowthFigures.pdf

Comparison with other CSO sources

Although the current price Supply and Use Tables are consistent with national accounts data published in NIE15 and thereby consistent with the balance of payments data compiled by the CSO, it is not possible to achieve full agreement with all CSO publications. The exercise of compiling Supply and Use Tables helps to identify discrepancies that exist within different data sources. It is hoped that some of these discrepancies will be removed over time.

There are four main reasons for differences that occur between the aggregates presented in the Supply and Use Tables and the aggregates presented in other publications, e.g. the Census of Industrial Production (CIP) and Annual Services Inquiry (ASI). Some examples of these are set out here.

Terminology

For the most part, the underlying definitions are consistent throughout CSO publications, but certain differences do arise. For example, the output in the Supply table is inclusive of freight and of the margin gained on goods resold without further processing. These two items may not be part of the term ‘gross output’ in the CIP. Also the term ‘compensation of employees’ in national accounts includes the employer’s contribution to social insurance and other labour costs, which are not included in the wages and salaries variable in CIP and ASI.

Accounting practices

Some international sales by Irish companies are included in the CIP gross turnover but are treated on a net basis (i.e. sales less purchases) in the balance of payments. This can arise particularly where Irish companies sell products abroad which they have also purchased abroad. The products purchased may never have come into Ireland or undergone any further processing following purchase by the Irish enterprise.  Supply and Use adjusts the CIP data and includes the net amount as an export of a service. Conversely, there are companies manufacturing on a fee basis whose transactions may be recorded gross in the international trade statistics. This can arise where companies process goods for another company in their enterprise group abroad. The goods are imported and exported and may therefore have been included in the merchandise trade statistics although ownership of the goods did not change in the process. Generally in these cases the merchandise trade is adjusted to convert the goods imported and exported to a fee based service for use in the balance of payments and national accounts. In the case of telecommunications, some of the turnover in the ASI arises from importing and exporting telecommunications services, whereas balance of payments uses a net treatment. Supply and Use adopts the balance of payments practice in these situations.

Classifications

Output by product may be classified differently in the Prodcom Inquiry to the export statistics. This difficulty is corrected by realigning at a product level the production with the exports or vice versa. Sometimes the classifications in the two systems are quite unrelated. For example, what appears in one classification as a chemical may be classified as food and beverages in another system.

Conflicts in classification also occur at the overall activity level of companies. The company’s NACE code in the national accounts and balance of payments may differ from the NACE code used by CIP or ASI. Usually the classification used in the CIP or ASI is adopted in the Supply and Use Tables. It can also happen that the mismatch highlights a problem that is resolved by transferring the company within the CIP or ASI.

Conflicting data

The Supply and Use Tables are compiled using data from different sources. It is therefore not surprising that there are occasional instances of contradictory and conflicting information. Some examples are: the value of production by a company, measured in the CIP, may be less than their exports, measured by the international merchandise trade statistics; the value added of a company, measured by national accounts from administrative sources, may not concur with the same variable derived in the CIP or the ASI; compensation of employees calculated in national accounts based on employment figures can conflict with the wages and salaries figures in the CIP and ASI, which are assembled from company data. Reconciliation of these types of problem can result in differences between the variable presented in the Supply and Use tables and the same variable in the CIP or ASI.

Changes in the publication

The Supply & Use Tables in the current publication are presented using the NACE Rev. 2 sectoral classification. 

In the 2010 tables a change was made to the treatment of NIE item 82(a) Net additions to the breeding stocks. Previously this was included in the changes in inventories figure (NIE item 82), but has been included in GFCF (NIE item 81).

There were three significant changes in treatment in the 2011 tables. These were the exclusion of purchases of goods for direct resale from the output of certain service industries, secondly the use of Balance of Payments (BOP) data to more comprehensively describe the secondary production of certain industries and thirdly the implementation of ESA 2010.

The 2012 tables included significant methodological revisions due to the recording of trade in aircraft on a "transfer of economic ownership" basis. Under the new National Accounts methodology, all trade in aircraft with the rest of the world is recorded as imports and exports of goods – regardless of where the aircraft is registered for aviation purposes. There are offsetting effects as both imports and exports increase but generally the new methodology has a greater effect on aircraft imports with the inclusion of purchases of aircraft by resident operational leasing companies in Ireland’s imports of goods. The net increase to Imports of Goods and Services (item 84 in NIE Table 5) in the National Accounts was offset by an increase in Capital Formation (item 81 in NIE Table 5) and the new methodology had no effect generally on GDP and GNP. However, there was a significant increase to the National Accounts provision for depreciation (item 28 in NIE Table 2) based on the higher capital stock, which resulted in an offsetting change in the level of Net Value Added at Factor Cost (item 13/27 in NIE Tables 1 and 2 respectively) and related aggregates.

These changes were seen most clearly in the S&UT for 2012 as an increase in imports of NACE 30 (Other transport equipment) products with an accompanying increase in NACE 30 Gross Fixed Capital Formation (GFCF). Similarly the consumption of fixed capital (CFC) total in the primary inputs figures in the lower rows at the bottom of the inter-industry use table was higher than in previous Supply & Use Tables.

The technical note at the following website below gives more detail on the revised trade in aircraft methodology and explains the impact the revisions have on Trade in Goods, National Accounts and Balance of Payments (http://www.cso.ie/en/surveysandmethodology/balanceofpayments/methodologydocuments/).

In addition, a small number of codes had new entries in 2012 for imports and/or exports. These figures are based on a more detailed split of Balance of Payments data than was previously used for S&UT purposes. Given the degree of uncertainty regarding such detailed splits, these data should be treated with some caution. A number of codes also had new entries in 2012 for final consumption expenditure of households based on further disaggregation for S&UT purposes of PCE data used in the national accounts. Again such disaggregated estimates should be treated with caution and as indicative only.

As mentioned above the imports and exports figures, including the cif/fob adjustment, in these current price Supply & Use Tables are consistent with the 2013 imports and exports figures in the NIE15. 

The 2013 tables in this publication are based in part on the revised CIP and ASI time-series published by the CSO on the 27th October 2016 and 4th November 2016 respectively. Output by industry from the Supply table remains, as previously, generally consistent (except for specific methodological reasons) with the production values by 2-digit NACE sector from both the CIP and ASI. Further details on the revised SBS series are available at the following website:

http://www.cso.ie/en/media/csoie/surveysandmethodologies/documents/pdfdocs/multisectoral/RevisedSBSnote.pdf

Other changes in the publication

The NACE code split as well as the product versus non-product split of Taxes and Subsidies have been amended by National Accounts. This is most evident in NACE 1-3 (Agriculture, forestry and fishing) where the estimates provided in the Supply and Use tables are now consistent with the estimates provided in the Output, Input and Income in Agriculture (OIIA) release published by the CSO. 

Similarly, the NACE code split of Gross Operating Surplus (GOS), which is the sum of Net Operating Surplus (NOS) and Consumption of Fixed Capital (CFC) are available in greater detail and are consistent in most (but not all) codes with the estimates contained within the calculations for NIE Table 21 Gross Value Added at current basic prices.

Conventions used

 The following conventions are used throughout the tables of this publication:

                 " – "         is used to denote zero

                " 0 "         represents less than  €0.5 million but more than zero

upArrowHide Background Notes

Scan the QR code below to view this release online or go to
http://www.cso.ie/en/releasesandpublications/ep/p-saucup/supplyandusetablesforireland2013/